Wake up before darkness descends – Haaretz Editorial – Israel News | Haaretz.com

Home   >   Opinion   >   Haaretz EditorialEditorial Wake Up Before Darkness DescendsBehind the growing influence of ultra-Orthodox Zionism stands a single purpose: to turn Israel into a caliphate, nondemocratic in its practices and non-Jewish in its valuesHaaretz Editorial Jan 21, 2018 2:31 AM  1comments   Zen Subscribe now  Shareshare on facebook  Tweet send via email reddit stumbleuponHabayit

Hayehudi MK Bezalel Smotrich and Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked.Tomer AppelbaumIn Israel, growing fascism and a racism akin to early NazismWhy I’m not a Zionist – and why you’re not, eitherForget Judaism – the army is Israel’s state religion The assignment of a female officer as a flight squadron commander in the Israel Air Force once again prompted a flood of arrogant comments from ultra-Orthodox Zionist rabbis. They were, predictably, joined by MK Bezalel Smotrich, who never misses an opportunity to demonstrate his moral darkness.This time, the pretext was deep concern for the easily inflamed animal instincts of religious male soldiers in a “coed” army. By their lights, in order to protect the modesty of enlistees, the chief-of-staff should be dismissed and female soldiers must be prohibited from singing, their sinful flesh wrapped in reams of opaque fabric.This collection of sexual justifications does not deserve to be taken seriously. Hundreds of thousands of religiously observant men served in the army throughout its first 50 years — with, alongside and even subordinate to women. All of these women exposed their hair and their legs below the knee and sang in public. In all of those years, not a single incident of exceptional hormonal activity on the part of the male soldiers was recorded. It was only after the influence of the Haredi-Zionist stream and its rabbis were the overactive animal instincts of our soldiers disclosed. To believe this nonsense, presumably one must accept the Haredi-Zionist rule according to which only religious people have feelings; secular people have only animal instincts…But the Haredi-Zionist rabbis are nothing more than the comic relief in the campaign of religious indoctrination and growing influence of ultra-Orthodox Zionism overall: Naftali Bennett in the area of education, Ayelet Shaked in the judicial system, Arye Dery in maintaining blood purity, the settlers in further entrenching the occupation, the Haredi divisions in daily religious indoctrination and the exclusion of woman. Increasingly benighted textbooks in the schools, a judicial system that assigns growing areas of jurisdiction to a rabbinical court system that is not subject to the laws of the state, and an Interior Ministry that has becomes a divorce contractor for people of impure blood.Behind all of these developments stands a single purpose: to turn Israel into a benighted, racist and violent fundamentalist caliphate, nondemocratic in its practices and non-Jewish in its values, that sees itself as beholden only to God and not to its citizens.Keep updated: Sign up to our newsletterEmail*Sign upIsraeli democracy needed to wake up long ago in order to rise up and defend itself from everyone who exploits the basic rights granted by law in order to sabotage it. To disastrous results, the government supports, funds and encourages this Haredi-Zionist process, whether out of a belief in its dark path or out of fear of losing power.World history teaches what happens to democracies that fail to defend themselves adequately. Jewish history teaches what happens to the Jewish people when evil emerges and is not nipped in the bud in time.

Source: Wake up before darkness descends – Haaretz Editorial – Israel News | Haaretz.com

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Belgium to arrest former Israeli FM for “war crimes” – Middle East Monitor

Belgium to arrest former Israeli FM for “war crimes”January 20, 2017 at 12:33 am | Published in: Belgium, Europe & Russia, Israel, Middle East, News, PalestineImage of former Minister of Foreign Affairs of Israel, Tzipi Livni [file photo]January 20, 2017 at 12:33 am

A Belgian court has ordered the arrest of the former Minister of Foreign Affairs of Israel, Tzipi Livni, when she steps off the plane on her arrival in the Belgian capital Brussels on 23 January, official EU sources revealed on Thursday.On 23 June 2010, a group of victims filed a complaint in Belgium to the Federal Prosecutor against certain Israeli civilian and military officials at the time, including Tzipi Livni, for war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in the Gaza Strip, according to Palestinian News Network (PNN).The Federal Prosecutor’s Office confirmed that Livni would be intercepted by the Federal Judicial Police during her stay in Belgium to be heard and questioned following the complaint lodged against her and that it would ensure the necessary follow-up to this case.Livni was the Israeli Minister of Foreign Affairs at the time of the Israeli military operation  “Cast Lead” in the Gaza Strip, which took place from 27 December 2008 to 18 January 2009. She is scheduled to arrive in Brussels on 23 January to participate in a conference in the European Parliament.

Source: Belgium to arrest former Israeli FM for “war crimes” – Middle East Monitor

we can but wait and see, these zionist jew-girls are a special kind of evil but arrested AND QUESTIONED i think not.IT is just words that are being said no action will come of it .Shame Iit really is a crying shame.

In 1920, Jews, Italians, Irish And Greeks Were The People From ‘Shithole’ Countries | HuffPost

In 1920, Jews, Italians, Irish And Greeks Were The People From ‘Shithole’ Countries01/15/2018 06:27 am ET Updated 16 hours ago3.1k PUCKLooking Backward” by Joseph Keppler, 1893Last week Donald Trump called for blocking immigrants from “shithole” countries, setting off a wave of domestic and international condemnation. Despite reports by eyewitnesses including Senator Dick Durbin of Illinois, a Democrat, and Senator Jeff Flake of Arizona, a Republican, Trump denied insulting Haitians, Central Americans, and Africans. He also repeatedly denies that he is a racist. Representative Mia Love, a Republican and the only Haitian American in Congress, accepted the truth of the reports, called Trump’s behavior unacceptable, and demanded an apology.The government of Botswana, a nation is southern Africa, called Trump’s comments “highly irresponsible, reprehensible, and racist,” and demanded to know from the U.S. ambassador whether they were considered a “shithole” country. In Brussels, a European Union lawmaker, told the Associated Press that Mr. Trump “had forgotten to engage his brain before talking.”The United States ambassador to Panama, a career diplomat and former Marine Corps officer, resigned because he could no longer honorably serve as a representative of the Trump administration. However, the best response to Trump was probably by Trevor Noah on Comedy Central who declared, “As someone from South Shithole, I’m offended.” Noah’s comments are worth watching.Unrepentant, on Sunday Trump tweeted: “I, as President, want people coming into our Country who are going to help us become strong and great again, people coming in through a system based on MERIT. No more Lotteries! #AMERICA FIRST.”Apparently Donald Trump wants to keep out non-white immigrants from Africa, Central America, and the Caribbean, and is encouraging immigration from all-white Norway. But Norway is a very sparely populated country with a little more than 5 million people, and according to the CIA World Factbook, its per capita GPA is amongst the highest in the world and its health care and educational systems are excellent, so Norwegians are unlikely to immigrate to the United States, especiall7y with Donald Trump in the White House.This is not the first time that American leaders wanted to keep out “undesirable” immigrants from “shithole” countries. In 1753, Benjamin Franklin denounced Germans pouring into Pennsylvania because they refused to assimilate to American customs and values. By the way, the Trump family is of German decent.The cartoon above is from Puck magazine and was initially published in 1893. Five well-dressed, prosperous looking men are blocking the path of a newly arriving immigrant. Looming behind them are shadows representing their impoverished selves or family members when they first arrived in the United States. But now they want to prevent a new wave of immigrants, from I guess, “shithole” countries.It is worth examining Congressional debate in 1920 and 1921, when the people from “shithole” countries were Jews, Italians, Irish, and Greeks. During World War I Congress imposed a literacy test to try to restrict undesirable immigrants from Eastern and Southern Europe. When this did not block enough newcomers, they established a quota system in 1921 and an even more restrictive quota in 1924.C. 1921A political cartoon advocating using a quota system to keep out European immigrants who were considered undesirable.Subscribe to The Morning Email.Wake up to the day’s most important news.Between 1900 and 1909, 2 million immigrants came to the United States from the Austro-Hungarian Empire; 1.9 million from Italy; 1.5 million from Russia; almost 350,000 from Ireland; and 145,00 from Greece. The immigrants from Austro-Hungary and Russia were largely Jews. Immigration was disrupted between 1910 and 1919 by World War I, spiked in 1920 and 1921, and then declined as a result of the quota laws. Between 1930 and the outbreak of World War II in 1939, as a result of the quotas but also the Great Depression, there were only 12,500 immigrants from the former Austro-Hungarian Empire; 85,000 from Italy; 2,400 from Russia; 28,000 from Ireland; and 10,500 from Greece. Overall, immigration to the United States plummeted from 8.2 million people between 1900 and 1909 to fewer than 700,000 between 1930 and 1939, which was less than 1/10th. These quotas were responsible for keeping Jews fleeing Hitler and Nazi Germany from entering the United States, including my relatives, in the 1930s.In 1920, Representative James V. McClintic, a Democrat from Oklahoma, was chair of the House Immigration Committee. During debate he claimed to have visited Ellis Island where he saw immigrants with no money, the “off casts of the countries from which they came,” who were “Practically all of them were weak, small of stature, poorly clad, emaciated . . . It is for this reason that I say the class of immigrants coming to the shores of the United States at this time are n

Source: In 1920, Jews, Italians, Irish And Greeks Were The People From ‘Shithole’ Countries | HuffPost

One Country – A Bold Proposal To End The Israeli-Palestinian Impasse

لماذا غزة؟ Why Gaza?

By Ali Abunimah (2006)

One Country“Crazy!” my Jewish friends and family might say, but this small book (a quick read in two nights) spells out a very strong argument for ending the status quo in Israel-Palestine which few think is good for anyone.

This might have been “bold” in 2006 but the one-state idea has received much more attention in recent years.

The status quo isn’t working for anyone.

Israeli Jews live in constant fear of the “other” and discomfort that the realities of the occupation don’t match up with their religious ideals of justice, fairness and טוֹב.

Palestinians live under the daily grind and humiliation of the occupation, the unrelenting violence and death, the brutal treatment at the hands of the “other”.

The exalted two-state plan has been the ostensible goal of the international community and U.S. Administrations for decades. Presumably, Donald Trump’s “deal of the century” envisions two states…

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SUBHUMAN I D F KILL PALESTINIAN THEN DEFACE HIS DEATH NOTICE WITH STARS OF DAVID .

Gideon Levy 

After Palestinian Teen Is Killed by IDF, Troops Deface His Death Notice With Stars of David

Musab Tamimi, 16, was shot dead by Israeli troops during a clash in the West Bank. The army claims he was armed, but witnesses say otherwise

Here’s what soldiers of the Israel Defense Forces scrawled on a mourning notice for 16-year-old Musab Tamimi, who was killed by a sniper’s shot to the throat: “Son of a bitch, slut, dead.” For good measure, they drew a Star of David.

Two days after they killed the teen, IDF troops again invaded his village, Deir Nizam, north of Ramallah. In a late-night raid, they arrested four young residents and left behind as a souvenir the memorial notice they violated. Neatly folded, the notice is now in the possession of the bereaved father, Firas Tamimi. An expression of pain crosses his face when he shows it to us. He was the one who carried his bleeding son two weeks ago to the car and rushed him to a hospital, where the teen was pronounced dead.

Firas Tamimi holds up the defaced mourning notice.
Firas Tamimi holds up the defaced mourning notice.Alex Levac

Musab was born in the house we are visiting. On the day of his birth, May 18, 2001, Lt. Yair Nebenzahl, from the settlement of Halamish, was killed by Palestinian gunfire on the road near Deir Nizam. As a result, the whole area was placed under closure, just as Dina Tamimi was about to give birth to her first child. The IDF fired tear gas into homes in the village and sealed it off. Soldiers prevented the Palestinian ambulance that was called to take Dina to the hospital from entering the village, and she was forced to give birth at home. It was a boy.

On January 3, Musab was killed a few meters from where he came into the world.

The family has had more than its share of suffering. Firas, 43, who retired after working for Palestinian intelligence, has a heart condition; four years ago, the family went to Jordan, for him to get medical treatment. But when they tried to return home, they were denied entry by Israel: Dina was registered as a resident of the Gaza Strip, and was therefore not permitted into the West Bank. In fact, she was born in Deir Nizam, but because her father, Farhud, was Yasser Arafat’s personal pilot during the period in the 1990s that the Palestinian leader was based in Gaza, she grew up in the Strip and was registered as a resident there.

It was not until last summer, after four years of forced exile in Jordan, that Israel allowed the family to return to their village. They arrived on August 21. Musab was delighted to be home. At school in Amman, he’d been head of the student council and a member of the choir. But he also remained active in Deir Nizam, participating in demonstrations against the occupation. His father shows us a video clip on his cellphone. Musab is reading a poem he wrote, a muscular youth in a red T-shirt, reading a love poem to the land of his birth.

On that fateful morning early this month, Firas went with Musab to the neighboring village, Abud, to buy bread at a popular bakery. It was the semester break at West Bank schools. On the way, his father pointed out the high school he’d attended and told Musab that during the first intifada, when he was a student there, the IDF had shut down the institution for half a year. The two then returned home for breakfast. At about 10 o’clock they heard the sounds of gunfire outside.

A colorful panorama – a valley of olive trees – unfolds from the yard of the Tamimi house. Photos of the dead son are pasted on the iron front door. The settlement of Halamish looms on the ridge across the way, and behind it the village of Nabi Saleh, some of whose residents are relatives of the Tamimi family and have been much in the news lately. Hearing the shooting, Musab went outside to see what was going on and perhaps to take part in throwing stones at the soldiers. His father urged him to be careful.

The IDF had been in the village two days earlier, and had detained Musab and photographed him. According to his father, one of the officers told his son, “We don’t want to arrest you today, but we’ll be back and will meet again. You’ll be sorry.” The words now echo in the room; Firas is convinced that the soldiers were out to kill his son.

Passions were running high in the streets on January 3, when Musab went outside after hearing the shooting. Below, next to the main road, the usual confrontations were taking place. Soldiers were in hot pursuit of stone throwers. They arrested 19-year-old Mustafa Saleh Tamimi, who is is also related to Musab’s family, and who is known to be mentally ill.

Firas, watching the events from his yard up the hill, quickly drove down to the main road, to try and get Mustafa released. The soldiers chased him away and took Mustafa with them. Firas recalls that he saw them beating the teen before bundling him into an army vehicle. He followed them in his car to the nearby base, still hoping to get him freed. From the road, he saw the officer who’d arrested Mustafa take him into the base and then return to the site of the clashes in Deir Nizam, where the situation became more fraught following the arrest of the mentally unsound young man. Another IDF officer promised Firas that Mustafa would be set free after he was checked – and he was.

Firas returned to the yard of his house. The confrontations continued below. Using gunfire and tear gas, the soldiers drove the stone throwers back into the village, where they were outflanked by another force that charged them from behind. An IDF drone hovered overhead, filming the events. Musab was there with his brother Osama, who’s a year younger, amid the olive trees at the edge of town.

At about 1 P.M., Firas heard the sound of heavy gunfire. Again he sped down to the scene of the clashes, about a minute’s drive. He had a bad feeling; two of his sons were there. At the bottom of the road he saw someone lying on the ground, blood streaming from his neck, with some youths standing around him. Only after Firas got out of the car did he realize that it was Musab. Immediately he carried him to his car and drove as fast as he could toward Ramallah.

Recalling the incident now, Firas speaks in a factual tone of voice; there are no tears. Two youths accompanied him, he says, all the while checking whether Musab was still alive. He too stretched his arm out behind every so often, while driving, to see if his son was breathing. But within a short time, he apparently was not.

On the way they called a Palestinian ambulance, which met them next to the Atara checkpoint. Musab was transferred to the ambulance, which in short order arrived at the new Istishari Hospital in Ramallah. Shortly afterward, Musab was officially pronounced dead. He’d been hit by a live round in a main artery of the neck.

The Israeli media reported that Musab was shot and killed because he’d been armed with a rifle. Osama, his brother, who had been by his side, denies that Musab was holding a rifle or anything else.

Says Firas: “If he had a rifle, why didn’t the army take it? Even if we talk and talk about what happened, the Israelis will not be convinced. They will continue to claim that Musab was holding a rifle.”

This week, before our visit to Deir Nizam, a villager was summoned for a talk with “Captain Malek” from the Shin Bet security service. Through him, Firas relates, the agent conveyed a message to Musab’s family not to talk to the media and to ensure quiet in the village.

In response to a request for comment, the IDF Spokesperson’s Unit told Haaretz this week: “Some two weeks ago, there was a violent disturbance in the village of Deir Nizam, in which dozens of Palestinians participated. IDF forces identified an armed Palestinian, and in response shot at him. The Palestinian was evacuated in a private vehicle for medical treatment. Immediately after the incident IDF forces searched the area of the village, with the purpose of locating the suspect. The incident is under investigation.

“Additionally, information was received recently about offensive graffiti being spray-painted in the village. A check did not turn up information about the identity of the graffiti writer, and from our investigation, soldiers were not involved.”

According to Osama, who was near Musab when he was shot, they were part of a small group of teens who ran for their lives from the soldiers. Osama hid behind an olive tree; Musab was among the rocks abutting the road leading to Deir Nazem. Osama says he saw the IDF sniper aim his weapon at his brother and shouted to Musab to move toward him, a safer spot. A few meters separated the two brothers. And a few dozen meters separated them from the sniper, who had taken cover behind the bare fig tree on the slope of the hill, next to the last house in the village.

Osama had just thrown himself on the ground when he heard a lone shot. His brother had stood up in order to scramble to a more protected place, and it was then that he was shot in the neck. Immediately afterward, Osama heard shouts in Arabic: Wounded, wounded! He got up and saw his brother lying on the ground by the roadside. He went over to him and asked him to recite a verse from the Koran, but when Musab tried to speak, blood gushed from his mouth. Then their father arrived and took him.

Musab’s funeral was held in the village the following day. Clashes broke out again along the road; again the soldiers fired tear-gas grenades and rubber-coated metal bullets. Mohammed Afif Awad, 20, suffered a serious injury when a bullet hit him in the head.

SUBHUMAN I D F KILL PALESTINIAN THEN DEFACE HIS DEATH NOTICE WITH STARS OF DAVID .

Gideon Levy 

After Palestinian Teen Is Killed by IDF, Troops Deface His Death Notice With Stars of David

Musab Tamimi, 16, was shot dead by Israeli troops during a clash in the West Bank. The army claims he was armed, but witnesses say otherwise

Here’s what soldiers of the Israel Defense Forces scrawled on a mourning notice for 16-year-old Musab Tamimi, who was killed by a sniper’s shot to the throat: “Son of a bitch, slut, dead.” For good measure, they drew a Star of David.

Two days after they killed the teen, IDF troops again invaded his village, Deir Nizam, north of Ramallah. In a late-night raid, they arrested four young residents and left behind as a souvenir the memorial notice they violated. Neatly folded, the notice is now in the possession of the bereaved father, Firas Tamimi. An expression of pain crosses his face when he shows it to us. He was the one who carried his bleeding son two weeks ago to the car and rushed him to a hospital, where the teen was pronounced dead.

Firas Tamimi holds up the defaced mourning notice.
Firas Tamimi holds up the defaced mourning notice.Alex Levac

Musab was born in the house we are visiting. On the day of his birth, May 18, 2001, Lt. Yair Nebenzahl, from the settlement of Halamish, was killed by Palestinian gunfire on the road near Deir Nizam. As a result, the whole area was placed under closure, just as Dina Tamimi was about to give birth to her first child. The IDF fired tear gas into homes in the village and sealed it off. Soldiers prevented the Palestinian ambulance that was called to take Dina to the hospital from entering the village, and she was forced to give birth at home. It was a boy.

On January 3, Musab was killed a few meters from where he came into the world.

The family has had more than its share of suffering. Firas, 43, who retired after working for Palestinian intelligence, has a heart condition; four years ago, the family went to Jordan, for him to get medical treatment. But when they tried to return home, they were denied entry by Israel: Dina was registered as a resident of the Gaza Strip, and was therefore not permitted into the West Bank. In fact, she was born in Deir Nizam, but because her father, Farhud, was Yasser Arafat’s personal pilot during the period in the 1990s that the Palestinian leader was based in Gaza, she grew up in the Strip and was registered as a resident there.

It was not until last summer, after four years of forced exile in Jordan, that Israel allowed the family to return to their village. They arrived on August 21. Musab was delighted to be home. At school in Amman, he’d been head of the student council and a member of the choir. But he also remained active in Deir Nizam, participating in demonstrations against the occupation. His father shows us a video clip on his cellphone. Musab is reading a poem he wrote, a muscular youth in a red T-shirt, reading a love poem to the land of his birth.

On that fateful morning early this month, Firas went with Musab to the neighboring village, Abud, to buy bread at a popular bakery. It was the semester break at West Bank schools. On the way, his father pointed out the high school he’d attended and told Musab that during the first intifada, when he was a student there, the IDF had shut down the institution for half a year. The two then returned home for breakfast. At about 10 o’clock they heard the sounds of gunfire outside.

A colorful panorama – a valley of olive trees – unfolds from the yard of the Tamimi house. Photos of the dead son are pasted on the iron front door. The settlement of Halamish looms on the ridge across the way, and behind it the village of Nabi Saleh, some of whose residents are relatives of the Tamimi family and have been much in the news lately. Hearing the shooting, Musab went outside to see what was going on and perhaps to take part in throwing stones at the soldiers. His father urged him to be careful.

The IDF had been in the village two days earlier, and had detained Musab and photographed him. According to his father, one of the officers told his son, “We don’t want to arrest you today, but we’ll be back and will meet again. You’ll be sorry.” The words now echo in the room; Firas is convinced that the soldiers were out to kill his son.

Passions were running high in the streets on January 3, when Musab went outside after hearing the shooting. Below, next to the main road, the usual confrontations were taking place. Soldiers were in hot pursuit of stone throwers. They arrested 19-year-old Mustafa Saleh Tamimi, who is is also related to Musab’s family, and who is known to be mentally ill.

Firas, watching the events from his yard up the hill, quickly drove down to the main road, to try and get Mustafa released. The soldiers chased him away and took Mustafa with them. Firas recalls that he saw them beating the teen before bundling him into an army vehicle. He followed them in his car to the nearby base, still hoping to get him freed. From the road, he saw the officer who’d arrested Mustafa take him into the base and then return to the site of the clashes in Deir Nizam, where the situation became more fraught following the arrest of the mentally unsound young man. Another IDF officer promised Firas that Mustafa would be set free after he was checked – and he was.

Firas returned to the yard of his house. The confrontations continued below. Using gunfire and tear gas, the soldiers drove the stone throwers back into the village, where they were outflanked by another force that charged them from behind. An IDF drone hovered overhead, filming the events. Musab was there with his brother Osama, who’s a year younger, amid the olive trees at the edge of town.

At about 1 P.M., Firas heard the sound of heavy gunfire. Again he sped down to the scene of the clashes, about a minute’s drive. He had a bad feeling; two of his sons were there. At the bottom of the road he saw someone lying on the ground, blood streaming from his neck, with some youths standing around him. Only after Firas got out of the car did he realize that it was Musab. Immediately he carried him to his car and drove as fast as he could toward Ramallah.

Recalling the incident now, Firas speaks in a factual tone of voice; there are no tears. Two youths accompanied him, he says, all the while checking whether Musab was still alive. He too stretched his arm out behind every so often, while driving, to see if his son was breathing. But within a short time, he apparently was not.

On the way they called a Palestinian ambulance, which met them next to the Atara checkpoint. Musab was transferred to the ambulance, which in short order arrived at the new Istishari Hospital in Ramallah. Shortly afterward, Musab was officially pronounced dead. He’d been hit by a live round in a main artery of the neck.

The Israeli media reported that Musab was shot and killed because he’d been armed with a rifle. Osama, his brother, who had been by his side, denies that Musab was holding a rifle or anything else.

Says Firas: “If he had a rifle, why didn’t the army take it? Even if we talk and talk about what happened, the Israelis will not be convinced. They will continue to claim that Musab was holding a rifle.”

This week, before our visit to Deir Nizam, a villager was summoned for a talk with “Captain Malek” from the Shin Bet security service. Through him, Firas relates, the agent conveyed a message to Musab’s family not to talk to the media and to ensure quiet in the village.

In response to a request for comment, the IDF Spokesperson’s Unit told Haaretz this week: “Some two weeks ago, there was a violent disturbance in the village of Deir Nizam, in which dozens of Palestinians participated. IDF forces identified an armed Palestinian, and in response shot at him. The Palestinian was evacuated in a private vehicle for medical treatment. Immediately after the incident IDF forces searched the area of the village, with the purpose of locating the suspect. The incident is under investigation.

“Additionally, information was received recently about offensive graffiti being spray-painted in the village. A check did not turn up information about the identity of the graffiti writer, and from our investigation, soldiers were not involved.”

According to Osama, who was near Musab when he was shot, they were part of a small group of teens who ran for their lives from the soldiers. Osama hid behind an olive tree; Musab was among the rocks abutting the road leading to Deir Nazem. Osama says he saw the IDF sniper aim his weapon at his brother and shouted to Musab to move toward him, a safer spot. A few meters separated the two brothers. And a few dozen meters separated them from the sniper, who had taken cover behind the bare fig tree on the slope of the hill, next to the last house in the village.

Osama had just thrown himself on the ground when he heard a lone shot. His brother had stood up in order to scramble to a more protected place, and it was then that he was shot in the neck. Immediately afterward, Osama heard shouts in Arabic: Wounded, wounded! He got up and saw his brother lying on the ground by the roadside. He went over to him and asked him to recite a verse from the Koran, but when Musab tried to speak, blood gushed from his mouth. Then their father arrived and took him.

Musab’s funeral was held in the village the following day. Clashes broke out again along the road; again the soldiers fired tear-gas grenades and rubber-coated metal bullets. Mohammed Afif Awad, 20, suffered a serious injury when a bullet hit him in the head.

In Israel, growing fascism and a racism akin to early Nazism – Haaretz – Israel News | Haaretz.com

Opinion In Israel, Growing Fascism and a Racism Akin to Early NazismThey don’t wish to physically harm Palestinians. They only wish to deprive them of their basic human rights, such as self-rule in their own state and freedom from oppressionZeev Sternhell 19.01.2018 02:00 Updated: 2:01 AM  3comments   Zen Subscribe now  Shareshare on facebook  Tweet send via email reddit stumbleupon

Israeli border police arrest a Palestinian in the West Bank.

Source: In Israel, growing fascism and a racism akin to early Nazism – Haaretz – Israel News | Haaretz.com